Friday, July 25, 2008

Poetry Friday: Leigh Hunt and Original

Lisa Chellman had posted John Keats' fifteen minute sonnet earlier this month. Here is the sonnet by Leigh Hunt who was the other party in the contest:




To the Grasshopper and the Cricket
Leigh Hunt

Green little vaulter in the sunny grass,
Catching your heart up at the feel of June,
Sole voice that's heard amidst the lazy noon,
When even the bees lag at the summoning brass;
And you, warm little housekeeper, who class
With those who think the candles come too soon,
Loving the fire, and with your tricksome tune
Nick the glad silent moments as they pass;
Oh sweet and tiny cousins, that belong
One to the fields, the other to the hearth,
Both have your sunshine; both, though small, are strong
At your clear hearts; and both were sent on earth
To sing in thoughtful ears this natural song:
Indoors and out, summer and winter,--Mirth.






I did my own personal 15 minute poem earlier this week (and quite honestly since I thought about it 5 minutes before writing, make it 20). I'm amazed that Keats and Hunt could do these in 15 minutes. Not only are they roughly twice the length, but they're about 1000% more serious writing. On the positive -- my poem did give me a good jump-start for my novel revisions.



Anyhow, here's what I did with 15-20 minutes:



STOP SIGNS

You know that red, octagonal sign
The word "STOP" on yours and mine

My wheels lock and yours roll through
That brake shop trip must be past due

Or perhaps your foot went numb
You hit the gas -- that thought was dumb

Ahh, you site the legal clause
It's acronymic: Slow To Optional Pause


Poetry Friday is hosted this week at: http://readingyear.blogspot.com/

5 comments:

PJ Hoover said...

You are truly an engineer! Love this poem! OK, now this is my kind of poetry!
Have a great weekend!

Lisa Chellman said...

I know that stop sign behavior all too well! (It seems to pair nicely with ignoring bikers and pedestrians.)

I'm starting to get inspired. My husband's reading Stephen Fry's book The Ode Less Traveled, which may also serve as a kick in the butt. Hmmm.

Mary Lee said...

Love the punch line (punch couplet??) at the end. Clever. And so true. (Of other drivers. Never me, of course!)

Jim D said...

PJ: ....truly an engineer! I know that's high praise from you. Thanks!

Lisa: Looks like you're about to be in a two poet household. Fry's book looks interesting.

Mary Lee: I love the term "punch couplet". Thanks for hosting and visiting.

Lisa Chellman said...

Ok, Jim, I have yet to crack Fry's book, BUT I did take the plunge and write a poem! It's here.